Summer 2021 Urban Heat - Mapping and Impacts

Apr 20, 2021

For the summer of 2021, NOAA is partnering with citizen scientists and additional organizations to map the hottest parts of cities in 11 states.

Again this year, NOAA is partnering with citizen scientists and additional organizations to map the hottest parts of cities in 11 states. Using heat sensors mounted on their own cars or bikes, community volunteers, led by a team of local partners in each city, will traverse their neighborhoods morning, afternoon, and evening on one of the hottest days of the year. The sensors will record temperature, humidity, time, and the volunteers’ location every second.

According to a recent nationwide study spurred by previous NOAA and partner heat island campaign efforts, neighborhoods subjected to historical redlining typically lack green space and suffer most from urban heat. The study found that 94% of formerly redlined areas, which remain mostly lower income communities of color, are exposed to higher temperatures than non-redlined, affluent areas.

Watch the media kickoff roundtable discussion below. Find out where and when these projects are taking place and get additional background and reporting resources on urban heat islands at the following links:

Media contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
202-379-6693


Get more heat-related reporting resources and data below from our searchable media library: