Workshop: Paris, We’re Back! Now What?

Feb 19, 2021

Protecting Americans from climate change requires that we work with all nations to reduce global emissions of heat-trapping pollution to net zero as quickly as possible.

Le Bourget 2015 - birthplace of the Paris Agreement

VIEW WORKSHOP RECORDING

Andrew Light is the new Acting Assistant Secretary for International Affairs and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Energy.  

Dr. Light spoke with Climate Communication’s Susan Joy Hassol about the repercussions of the U.S.’ temporary absence from the Paris Agreement and the path forward for the United States. Important points made by Dr. Light included:

  • Exiting the Paris Agreement made Americans less safe, and threatened America’s economic prosperity. Rejoining is the path to enhanced security and prosperity.
  • The vast majority of heat-trapping pollution, 85%, is created by nations other than the United States. Protecting Americans from climate change requires that we work with all nations to reduce global emissions of heat-trapping pollution to net zero as quickly as possible.
  • The economic opportunity associated with this transition to a clean energy economy is enormous, a minimum of $23 trillion over the next decade alone. Engaging with the world on the Paris Agreement--thereby ensuring that American innovation, technology, and manufacturing capability is part of the mix--is the surest path to American economic revitalization.  

Resources for Reporters:

Climate Central Resources

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